2013-04-04 / Front Page

FCMC Opens Wound Care Services

SPECIAL TO THE NEWS


FCMC staff hold a “Band Aid Cutting”ceremony to open its new Wound Center Services. Pictured from left: Cindy Keith, CRNP; Kim Slee, director of nursing services; Beth Lopez, director of Wound Care Services; and HBOT technicians Christine Ward, LPN, and Julie Knepper, LPN. FCMC staff hold a “Band Aid Cutting”ceremony to open its new Wound Center Services. Pictured from left: Cindy Keith, CRNP; Kim Slee, director of nursing services; Beth Lopez, director of Wound Care Services; and HBOT technicians Christine Ward, LPN, and Julie Knepper, LPN. Monday, April 1, at Fulton County Medical Center officials cut the “band aid” to officially kick off the opening of its newest department: Wound Care Services. The new department was created from shelled out space in the main portion of the hospital. It took a little more than eight weeks to complete. The space is 1650 square feet with three treatment rooms and a hyperbaric chamber. The work was completed in-house by the center’s maintenance department and local contractors.

Wound Care Services offers a comprehensive program of specialized management by clinicians trained in wound care. The clinical oversight will be performed by a number of physicians at FCMC, including podiatrists Katie Cashdollar and Karly Richards; general surgeon Justin Rosenberger; and cardiologist Jeffrey Mandak.

The department can also provide referrals to home health, nutrition, and diabetic education. For more advanced wounds, hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) may be used. HBOT is a clinical treatment where the patient breathes 100 percent oxygen intermittently while enclosed in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber at a pressure greater than one atmospheric absolute. HBOT has been proven effective for many medical conditions, The Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine Society, one of the premier research institutes, has approved it to treat the following conditions:

A diabetic person with a wound that is slow to heal or is simply not healing;

Anyone with a wound that has not shown improvement in four weeks;

Certain infections of the bone and skin;

Someone with damaged tissue from radiation therapy;

Skin grafts with inadequate blood supply;

Brown or recluse spider bites;

Carbon monoxide poisoning;

Post operative infections;

Leg lacerations;

Pressure ulcers;

Osteomyelitis;

Gangrene;

Crush injuries;

Compartment syndrome;

Skin tears and lacerations;

Dog bites;

Frost bite;

Decompression sickness;

Lymphedema.

Wound Care Services is headed up by the director, Beth Lopez, and three staff members: Cindy Keith, CRNP, and HBOT technicians Julie Knepper, LPN, and Christine Ward, LPN. They will be happy to answer any questions at 717-485-2855.

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