2012-11-28 / Front Page

3-Day Bear Count Reaches 20

Fourth day total not yet available
By Chanin Rotz-Mountz
NEWS EDITOR


Burnt Cabins area resident Randall Piper bagged this huge 552-pound black bear last Monday while hunting in Dublin Township. Piper was hunt- ing on Shade Mountain when he made the kill. Burnt Cabins area resident Randall Piper bagged this huge 552-pound black bear last Monday while hunting in Dublin Township. Piper was hunt- ing on Shade Mountain when he made the kill. Luck was definitely on the side of 12-year-old Bow Ramsey. Not only did he not have school last Wednesday, but he used his time wisely and harvested his first-ever black bear on the fourth and final day of the statewide bear season.

The son of Carol Christy of Mc- Connellsburg and Hustontown resident Ashley Ramsey, the seventh grader at Forbes Road Junior/ Senior High School picked a good spot off Boy Scout Road at the family hunting camp to wait it out. With daylight dwindling, Ramsey got off a lucky shot at 4:31 p.m. on November 21.

The first-time bear hunter’s kill topped the scales at 230 pounds. Plans are to have the bruin turned into a mount.

Randall Piper of the Burnt Cabins area was also among the lucky sportsmen to bag a bear in Fulton County this year. Hunting on Shade Mountain in Dublin Township, Piper harvested his 552- pound bruin by 2:30 p.m. on Monday, November 20. At the close of the day, Pennsylvania Game Commission officials reported Piper’s was among the the largest black bears killed in the state and likely the largest harvested in county.

While the Thanksgiving holiday has kept Game Commission officials from releasing totals for the four-day season, results are currently in for the three-day harvest. The preliminary harvest reports show hunters killed 2,442 bears in the first three days statewide.

Here in Fulton County, a total of 20 bears were taken November 17, November 19 and November 20. That figure is in addition to the three bears that were harvested during this year’s archery season.

According to Fulton County Wildlife Conservation Officer Kevin Mountz, one reason hunters had a good season here was the bountiful acorn crop that allowed the bears to stay in the mountains. However, that didn’t mean Mountz and fellow officers didn’t receive their fair share of complaints regarding nuisance bears that had wandered onto properties in search of bird feeders or an unattended garbage can.

“Nuisance bear reports were up a bit here as well as general sightings. Anymore, it’s a rather common thing to hear someone talk about a recent bear sighting,” said Mountz. Ironically, Mountz and Game Commission cadet Josh Fette had their own sighting in the middle of bear season when a huge bruin around 500 pounds meandered across their path on Bark Road in Brush Creek Township.

“It was a gorgeous bear,” added Mountz, who has been receiving complaints about nuisance bears since the season closed last Wednesday.

“The complaints will be coming to an end soon as sows and most male bears will be denning up for the winter months. Some bears, however, will remain active through the winter months, especially on warmer days,” he said.

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