2012-10-17 / Local & State

Republicans Gather For Annual Fall Dinner

Attorney general candidate is keynote speaker
By Chanin Rotz-Mountz


David Freed, Republicans candidate for state attorney general, speaks to voters Friday night at the Hustontown Firehall. Fellow Republicans on hand included, left to right, county Republican Chairman Sam Metz, Rep. Dick Hess, Stanley Kerlin, Commissioner Craig Cutchall, Sheriff Keith Stains and Prothonotary Patty Suders Fix. David Freed, Republicans candidate for state attorney general, speaks to voters Friday night at the Hustontown Firehall. Fellow Republicans on hand included, left to right, county Republican Chairman Sam Metz, Rep. Dick Hess, Stanley Kerlin, Commissioner Craig Cutchall, Sheriff Keith Stains and Prothonotary Patty Suders Fix. NEWS EDITOR

Nearly 100 Republicans flooded the Hustontown Firehall Friday night to hear from their party’s state candidate for attorney general as well as other candidates on the November 6 ballot.

David Freed, the current district attorney in Cumberland County, made Fulton County a stop on his busy schedule as his itinerary is taking him across the state to promote his candidacy for Pennsylvania attorney general. Freed pointed out he has the backing of Fulton County District Attorney Travis Kendall and 40 additional colleagues across the state, who have also been elected to keep families safe.

Freed, a resident of Camp Hill, said he is in his seventh year as district attorney, having been elected twice by registered Republicans. Prior to that he was the first assistant district attorney for five years and started his career as a prosecutor in York.

“If you’re going to run for a statewide row office, like we are running for ... you better not have a huge ego because nobody pays attention to your race until the very, very end. We’re almost there. We’re 25 days out. People are going to start paying attention,” he said.

“People make up their mind at the end of these races ... . Three to four out of 10 voters are undecided in this race,” said Freed, who started his campaign December 6, 2011, in the lobby of the Cumberland County Courthouse talking about his experience and qualifications. He recapped those same talking points, outlining his agenda to protect Pennsylvania, which includes looking out for children, elderly, the community war against drugs, and taxpayers and their rights.

“We need to do what we do best as Republicans,” he concluded. “We need to concentrate on our grass roots. We need to get out and vote. We’re going to prevail on November 6 ... our grass roots are better, our messages are better and our candidates are better.”

John MacDonald, a representative for U.S. Senate candidate Tom Smith, spent several moments providing background on Smith, a former farmer and coal miner. Smith, MacDonald noted, also started his own energy company that created 100s of jobs in the state.

MacDonald said it was the American dream that allowed Smith to succeed, which is something that should be passed along to future generations.

MacDonald indicated four polls released last week show the race between Smith and incumbent Sen. Bob Casey Jr. is a dead heat. He noted the last six years have been disastrous, citing the lack of passed bills and budget.

U.S. Congressman Bill Shuster was unable to attend the October 12 fall dinner, however, office representative Nancy Bull addressed the crowd on topics such as redistricting, Marcellus shale and Obama Care, which Shuster has voted against 33 times in the House.

Having always received tremendous support from the area in the past, Bull encouraged those on hand to get involved and do all they can.

State Rep. Dick Hess spoke about the vice presidential debate that aired last Thursday and said the event made him “almost sick to his stomach.” He said the event moderator was terrible and didn’t have any control on what was going on. He added Vice President Joe Biden was rude, interrupted others and was trying to be funny, which backfired.

“We’re gaining momentum slowly,” stated Rep. Hess, who added the audience should talk with neighbors and friends about the race. “We have the ability to change it. Please get out and vote and get others to vote.

In conclusion, Hess thanked Fulton County residents for their support over the years. “Fulton County has been very good to me. I will continue to be there for you,” he said.

County Republican Chairman and local coordinator for the Romney/Ryan campaign Sam Metz said the presidential and vice presidential candidates were exciting to watch and the results were equally interesting. He added Pennsylvania is in play during the campaign, and he truly believes we can do it here. “Everyone get out and vote,” he said.

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