2011-09-15 / Front Page

Flooding Closes County Roads

By Chanin Rotz-Mountz
STAFF WRITER


Wooden Bridge Creek poured from its embankments where the stream intersects South Madden Road last Wednesday morning due to several days of heavy rainfall. Most of the county's state and township roadways that had been temporarily closed Wednesday were reopened by Thursday for motorists. Wooden Bridge Creek poured from its embankments where the stream intersects South Madden Road last Wednesday morning due to several days of heavy rainfall. Most of the county's state and township roadways that had been temporarily closed Wednesday were reopened by Thursday for motorists. Fulton County residents contended with water in their basements as well as on local roadways last week while local storm watchers continued to monitor excessive rainfall over the Labor Day weekend through Wednesday morning.

Even though rain fell across the entire county, residents from the northern tier appeared to have witnessed the most significant damage and rainfall.

In the Forbes Road School District, administrators were forced to make a tough call in the school’s daily operations Wednesday morning after having been in contact with township supervisors on roadway conditions. Initially starting out as a two-hour delay, the delay eventually turned into a full-blown closure.


Always a problem area for flooding in northern Fulton County, Sideling Hill Creek flooded its banks last Wednesday morning in the village of Dublin Mills. Due to the deep, fast moving waters motorists were unable to access the one-lane, hump backed bridge located on the Fulton/Huntingdon County line. Always a problem area for flooding in northern Fulton County, Sideling Hill Creek flooded its banks last Wednesday morning in the village of Dublin Mills. Due to the deep, fast moving waters motorists were unable to access the one-lane, hump backed bridge located on the Fulton/Huntingdon County line. Helping administrators make their final decision was fast-moving water covering numerous roadways in Taylor, Dublin and Wells townships that resulted in several road closures. Affected township roadways included Frick, Wooden Bridge, Doran and Pump Station.

In Dublin Township, Supervisor Jeff Croft told the “News” Wednesday the only road closures as of late morning were on Park Road in Fort Littleton and Tannery Road in Burnt Cabins. Otherwise, Croft said, excessive water the township encountered earlier on Taylor and Boy Scout roads at around 3 a.m. had re- ceded by 7 a.m.

Meanwhile, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation was continuing to alert motorists of a closure between the intersection of Route 30 in Harrisonville to the intersection of Second Street located in Dublin Township. Two state roadway closures existed in Taylor Township along Waterfall Road between the intersections of North Hess Road and New Grenada Highway as well as Dublin Mills Road from the intersection of North Madden Road to the one-lane, hump-back bridge on the Huntingdon County line.

Heading toward the county seat of McConnellsburg, the Central Fulton School District changed its two-hour delay to a one-day closure. The Southern Fulton School District was the lone district to open its doors last Wednesday following a two-hour delay.

Ayr Township Supervisor Gary “Punch” Hopkins was happy to report flooding was not an issue in spite of the ongoing rainfall. Hopkins said some streams, like Spring Run, weren’t even muddy, even though they were running at a faster pace than normal.

Since Sunday evening, Hopkins reported recording 6-3/10 inches of rain at the McConnellsburg based sewer plant.

“The rain was here. It’s unreal how the ground has taken care of it,” he said. The township’s lone issue was a tree down, which involved a power line and was taken care of during the early morning hours Wednesday.

Also in McConnellsburg, Buchanan State Forest District Forester Jim Smith stated the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources recorded 3.16 inches of rainfall during a 24-hour time frame between Tuesday and Wednesday morning. Heading out to assess any damage, the forester’s major concern was a possible washout of a culvert on the Oregon Road.

Licking Creek Township Supervisor John Swindell stated his township had been active this year with preventative maintenance ranging from widening roads to dyking efforts along the berms.

“After having 4.5 inches of rain and it’s (the water’s) not over the tile, that tells me something. I’m proud of our roads,” said Swindell, who added his area of the county received eight inches of rain since Sunday evening.

As the supervisor had not received any calls as of Wednesday mid-morning concerning water crossing any township roadways, Swindell planned to head out and check out any possible storm damage for himself. He predicted washout on the hilly sections of certain roads such as Lear and Pump Station.

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