2011-04-14 / Local & State

McConnellsburg Celebrates 225 Years On April 20


This photograph dates around 1896 when the tollhouse at Peach Orchard Road, which can be seen in the picture, was built by the Chambersburg-Bedford Turnpike Co. On the south side of town is the brick Presbyterian and stone-with-stucco White Church that anchor the corners of South Second and West Maple streets. The White Church, a union church used by German Reformed and United Brethren, was dynamited down about 1896. Most of the houses and stores along Lincoln Way had outbuildings at the back of their lot along the alleys. This photograph dates around 1896 when the tollhouse at Peach Orchard Road, which can be seen in the picture, was built by the Chambersburg-Bedford Turnpike Co. On the south side of town is the brick Presbyterian and stone-with-stucco White Church that anchor the corners of South Second and West Maple streets. The White Church, a union church used by German Reformed and United Brethren, was dynamited down about 1896. Most of the houses and stores along Lincoln Way had outbuildings at the back of their lot along the alleys. Founded April 20, 1786, McConnellsburg turns 225 years old on April 20. Historian Glenn Cordell submitted these early photographs of McConnellsburg, both taken from west of town, to mark the occasion.



This earlier photograph shows the steeple of the 1870 Methodist Church facing the courthouse on the town square, with the Lutheran Church steeple to the east. A one-story three-room frame schoolhouse was built north of the jail in 1882. A solid row of small stables and craft workshops line the first alley south of Lincoln Way (then called Water Street) where they had the use of water from the town stream. This earlier photograph shows the steeple of the 1870 Methodist Church facing the courthouse on the town square, with the Lutheran Church steeple to the east. A one-story three-room frame schoolhouse was built north of the jail in 1882. A solid row of small stables and craft workshops line the first alley south of Lincoln Way (then called Water Street) where they had the use of water from the town stream.

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