2011-02-03 / Front Page

Young Girl Lands Role In TV Hit “Hawaii Five-O”

Cameran Jamison part of call-back cast
By Chanin Rotz-Mountz STAFF WRITER


Twelve-year-old Cameran “Cami” Jamison recently earned a role as a call-back cast member with CBS’s remake of the popular “Hawaii Five-O” television show. Cami is pictured with her father, SSG Kenneth Barnes, who is preparing for deployment this spring to Afghanistan. Twelve-year-old Cameran “Cami” Jamison recently earned a role as a call-back cast member with CBS’s remake of the popular “Hawaii Five-O” television show. Cami is pictured with her father, SSG Kenneth Barnes, who is preparing for deployment this spring to Afghanistan. Having been told since an early age she should be a model, Cameran Jamison is always prepared for any photo opportunity. With her trusty camera at her side, the 12-year-old is constantly taking headshots of herself and, of course, her friends as practice for her future modeling career.

In fact, it was her headshot that now has the young girl’s dreams spiraling in a slightly different direction as an aspiring actress.

Born in McConnellsburg to Jaclyn Jamison-Barnes of Hustontown, and Kenneth Barnes of Trenton, N.J., “Cami” has relocated with her parents and older brother Anthony to the Hawaiian island of Oahu. The family resides on the U.S. Army base where SSG Barnes serves in the 25th Infantry Division at Schofield barracks.

With so many activities and classes available to young children and teens alike on the island, the Jamison-Barnes family was fortunate to recently receive a telephone call from an acquaintance who worked with CBS’s remake show “Hawaii Five-O” and the show’s casting director. A headshot sent to the casting director landed Cami a role on the January 24 episode where she played a young student being picked up by her parents at a private school due to a tsunami alert. The alert sends the inhabitants of the island to seek higher ground, but in actuality it was a false tsunami alarm as members of the Coast Guard were trying to steal drug bust money being kept in sandbags used to hold back rising waters.

According to Cami’s mother, shooting takes approximately seven to eight hours and entails wardrobe fittings, travelling to and from the set or location on the island, rehearsal and actual filming.

“Cami has always been interested in the business, and how it works behind the scenes,” said Jaclyn. “Watching the Disney Channel and all of the shows on that network has really inspired Cami to get into acting.”

For now, Cami will remain a member of the show’s call-back cast, which means she won’t be alerted to follow-up roles until a week before taping. Having already had a small taste of what it’s like to be on television, Cami hopes she will soon receive that call so she can relive some of her favorite aspects of the job that range from taking direction from the director, meeting new people and stars, and seeing how the crew works behind the scenes.

“She really wants to follow through with more jobs even if they are being an extra. The next step for her is to be represented by an agency and try to get more bookings for work. As her mom, I would prefer for her to remain in little parts until she is older so she can enjoy her childhood. If she keeps up with her grades and her chores, I will let her work as much as she wants,” said Jaclyn.

Being a relative newcomer to the business, Jaclyn reports her daughter hasn’t been affected and remains the same grounded pre-teen she was before. Although she’s been rather tightlipped about her acting while among those closest to her, she receives moral support and well wishes from both her friends and even the vice principal at Wheeler Middle School.

At home, she still has chores and schoolwork to complete in a timely fashion, mainly with help from her father, who is preparing for deployment this spring to Afghanistan.

“Cami and Kenny’s relationship is very close while he’s at home. They spend time on homework together and are always playing around. They even participated in a father-daughter day at an obstacle course the Army trains on,” Jaclyn stated. “Kenny’s career affects Cami and our family because we worry about him being in the infantry, and Cami is aware of what his job is. We go weeks without hearing from him sometimes. Cami definitely has an emotional connection with her daddy because at night she really misses him and will sometimes cry.”

Jaclyn added Cami’s new love for acting helps her pass the time when her father is away, but she certainly looks forward to his arrival home. Along with her father enjoying bragging rights about his daughter’s stardom are Cami’s grandmother, Arlene Jamison, Hustontown; grandparents and uncle Bruce and Belinda Barnes and Tony Barnes, all of Hedgesville, W.Va.; and uncles and aunts Tony and Elena Jamison, of Woodbridge, Va., and Shane and Amy Stewart, Indianapolis, Ind.

Previously aired episodes of “Hawaii Five-O,” including the January 24 show entitled “Kaie’e,” are available online at cbs.com. New shows air weekly on Mondays at 10 p.m.

Return to top