2010-12-09 / Local & State

Senatorial Candidate Sestak Visits Here

Congressman Joe Sestak, center, speaks to local Democrats Tuesday at Fulton County’s Democratic headquarters in McConnellsburg. Fulton County Democratic Club member Joy Dasher is seated next to Sestak.  Congressman Joe Sestak, center, speaks to local Democrats Tuesday at Fulton County’s Democratic headquarters in McConnellsburg. Fulton County Democratic Club member Joy Dasher is seated next to Sestak. Joe Sestak the losing Pennsylvania Democratic candidate for Senate, told party faithful at the Second Street headquarters Tuesday that “We came this close to winning” and that he planned to visit all 67 Pennsylvania counties to thank people for their support.

Sestak was defeated by Pat Toomey, a former Republican congressman, in the 2010 midterm elections in what was called a razor thin race that was not called for hours after polls closed.

“We came this close in this environment. This is a positive. People should know what we did in this environment. We didn’t back away and I just came by to say thanks,” Sestak told the gathering.

A two-term congressman representing the stateĆ­s 7th Congressional District, Sestak said he will continue in public service but gave no indication of what that public service may be. He did say he has no plans to mount another election campaign.

Those gathered to greet Sestak were more interested in what is happening in Washington today than in past campaigns. He was peppered with questions concerning the extension of the Bush tax cuts and effects on Social Security and healthcare. Sestak heard questioners express their frustration with the Democratic leadership in Washington and fear that cuts could doom Social Security.

Sestak said he would vote for the proposed compromise “because too many people are suffering.” He also said he believes that middle class tax cut must be extended.

Sestak was born in Delaware County, the suburban Philadelphia area he represents now in Congress, and grew up as one of eight children in a closely knit Catholic family. Graduating from the Naval Academy in 1974, he went on to earn a Ph.D. in political economy from Harvard in 1984 and rose in the Navy to become a three-star admiral and the highest ranking military officer ever elected to Congress.

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