2010-04-29 / Front Page

MacDonald Named Historian Of The Year

Mary Black receives special award
special award By Chanin Rotz-Mountz STAFF WRITER

Wayne MacDonald accepts the “Historian Of The Year’’ award from Fulton County Historical Society President Dick Miller at the society’s annual dinner meeting held last Thursday at the Hustontown Firehall. Wayne MacDonald accepts the “Historian Of The Year’’ award from Fulton County Historical Society President Dick Miller at the society’s annual dinner meeting held last Thursday at the Hustontown Firehall. A McConnellsburg area man who has a passion for both restoring vehicles and local history was honored by fellow history buffs last week as Fulton County’s Historian of the Year.

Referred to as the “Jay Leno of Cito,” Wayne MacDonald was presented the prestigious award for the year 2009 by Fulton County Historical Society President Dick Miller and secretary Ken Keebaugh.

Keebaugh informed the crowd gathered at the Hustontown Firehall last Thursday evening he couldn’t understand how MacDonald had been overlooked throughout the years as a possible award recipient. However, in looking at the current list of qualified nominees, Keebaugh stated, MacDonald easily stood head and shoulders above the rest.

Mary Black was honored for her years of service to the Fulton County Historical Society. She accepts her award from society President Dick Miller. Mary Black was honored for her years of service to the Fulton County Historical Society. She accepts her award from society President Dick Miller. Making reference to his own genealogy research that began approximately 30 years ago, Keebaugh pointed out there were several individuals who served as the real backbone of the Historical Society. MacDonald was one of those individuals.

“He’s calm, cool and calculating in a good way,” said Keebaugh of the newest Historian of the Year. “He’s someone the society has depended on and leaned on many times throughout the years for technical advice and leadership.”

In addition to being a leader within the Historical Society, MacDonald was touted as being a leader in his church by serving as elder and a member of the church choir. Furthermore, he worked his way up through the ranks at JLG Industries with a degree in mechanical engineering and re- tired as senior vice president in charge of engineering.

Miller added that Mac- Donald converted a 1925 Dodge Brothers into a tow truck and took both junior and senior national championship honors with his restoration project. To onlookers, his garage known as “Cito Garage” serves as a local museum.

Fellow historian Glenn Cordell and Miller teamed up to recognize former librarian Mary Black for her years of service. Cordell noted Black took over the duties of Historical Society librarian after Hazel Harr stepped down after 25 years of service due to severe arthritis. Black, according to reports, has helped with many requests for information and genealogy and was instrumental in helping set up the society’s new library space within the Fulton County Library.

In other matters addressed during the annual dinner and meeting, Miller introduced the society’s newest librarian, Naomi White, who has reportedly been doing a great job overseeing the office and research material.

Miller also introduced Leonard Powell of Seattle, Wash., to the dinner crowd. Powell travelled the longest distance of all in attendance to be on hand at the April 22 gathering.

Miller announced even though the Historical Society doesn’t wish to sink additional money into the Fulton House, it is currently searching for a carpenter to help weatherize and provide climate control for the attic of the facility. Shelves also need constructed to better organize the society’s growing collection of books and documents.

Matthew Dodd wrapped up the evening by sharing songs and tales of the life of the American hobo. Armed with a guitar, banjo, mandolin and harmonica, Dodd told about the emergence of the first hobo and also provided clarification on the difference between hobos, tramps and bums.

Hobos, Dodd stated, enjoyed the freedom of the open road and would seek employment during their travels, whether it be chopping wood or sharpening knives. In comparison, bums neither enjoyed work or travel, while tramps often travelled but didn’t seek work. A hobo puts his desire for freedom ahead of any personal gain, Dodd added.

Dodd further described terms such as hobo jungles and milk and honey routes during songs about these “Knights of the Road,” who rode the rails from job to job and town to town.

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