2009-10-29 / Local & State

GOP Urges Voters To Head To Polls

Congressman GT Thompson keynote speaker at fall dinner
STAFF REPORT

Congressman Glenn "GT" Thompson of Centre County speaks with county Republicans Friday night at Hustontown Firehall. Thompson is flanked by county Republican Chairman Mikeal Fix (left), Prothonotary Patty Suders Fix, Sen. John Eichelberger and Commissioner Bonnie Mellott Keefer. Congressman Glenn "GT" Thompson of Centre County speaks with county Republicans Friday night at Hustontown Firehall. Thompson is flanked by county Republican Chairman Mikeal Fix (left), Prothonotary Patty Suders Fix, Sen. John Eichelberger and Commissioner Bonnie Mellott Keefer. Registered voters received a series of reminders from county Republican officials and candidates last week on the importance of voting and why the November 3 election should not be considered an “off-year” election.

The speakers appeared before a crowd of 90 gathered for the fall Republican Committee dinner held at the Hustontown Firehall, some with hopes of reelection or retention and others for the purpose of touching on the current state of and changes within the federal government. Perhaps none in attendance Friday evening knew better of federal spending, programs and purported corruption in government than keynote speaker Congressman Glenn “GT” Thompson of Centre County.

Judge Van Horn Judge Van Horn The freshman congressman was sworn into office in the U.S. House of Representatives on January 6, 2009, as a representative of Pennsylvania’s 5th District. Prior to his election, Thompson logged almost three decades as a healthcare professional.

Taking the podium following a brief introduction by Fulton County Commissioner Bonnie Mellott Keefer, Thompson stated the Democratic majority has brought on a “new era of irresponsibility.” “We’ve seen the national deficit grow by leaps and bounds,” said Thompson. “ ... In 2007 our national debt was $8.5 trillion and that was out of control. In 2009, however, that debt is over $13 trillion and by 2012 it will be over $16 trillion.”

The congressman added one of the largest threats to national security is the deficit. Moving on, Thompson also spoke on the topics of the abundance of czars and the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN), the nation’s largest grassroots community organization of low- and moderate income people. ACORN currently has well over 400,000 mem- ber families organized into more than 1,200 neighborhood chapters in approximately 75 cities across the country.

“ACORN is certainly a culture of corruption,” said Thompson. “1.3 billion voter registration cards were turned in by ACORN in 2008. They have now been indicted for voter fraud in 17 states, including Pennsylvania.”

As a result of these allegations, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on September 17 by a vote of 345-75 to stop $8 billion in federal funding for the organization.

“We need to bring transparency back to government,” he concluded.

Fulton/Franklin County Court of Common Pleas judicial candidates Angela Rosenberry Krom and Shawn Meyers both took a moment to thank the crowd for their support in the spring primary as well as for future support. Krom stated it was Fulton County, which has opened itself so warmly to her family, that secured her position on the November 3 ballot. Meanwhile, Meyers reminded voters county size doesn’t matter as justice is equal for all citizens.

Facing a Democratic challenger next Tuesday, incumbent Patty Suders Fix stated she couldn’t stress enough how important it is to keep an experienced candidate in office, one who knows how to record residents’ deeds, probate loved ones’ will and oversee a variety of documents ranging from civil suits to guardianships.

“These are the legal records your attorney has prepared for you and are brought to my office to be entered into record,” said the prothonotary. “I encourage you to speak with my colleagues who have endorsed me and work with me on a daily basis. They know firsthand of my work ethic, my knowledge of the job and my reputation for accuracy and, above all, honesty.”

Jury Commissioner Glenn “Pete” Ford publicly thanked residents for their past and future support. On the heels of Ford’s brief statement, Judge Carol Van Horn of the Fulton/Franklin County Court of Common Pleas asked for voters to support her through retention that would result in another 10 years in office. Forbes Road School Board candidate Chanin Rotz-Mountz also spoke briefly to the crowd about the upcoming election and her candidacy.

Notable officials on hand for the October 23 dinner were state vice chair Joyce Haas, Sheriff Keith Stains, county chairman Mikeal Fix, newest Commissioner Craig Cutchall, county treasurer Monica Seville, Sen. John Eichelberger, state committeeperson Stanley Kerlin, county auditors Rebecca Kendall and Kimberly Seiders and representatives from the office of Congressman Bill Shuster and Rep. Dick L. Hess.

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