2008-10-16 / Local & State

5 Stops On Festival House Tour

Historical Society hosts annual event this Saturday and Sunday
By Lindsay R. Mellott STAFF WRITER

Nadine and Charlie Carbaugh's mountaintop home overlooking McConnellsburg is one of the homes showcased in this year's Fall Festival house tour. Nadine and Charlie Carbaugh's mountaintop home overlooking McConnellsburg is one of the homes showcased in this year's Fall Festival house tour. The Fulton County Historical Society will showcase five of Fulton County's unique homes and historic structures at its annual Fulton Fall Folk Festival house tour this Saturday and Sunday afternoon.

All of the tour's homes this year are located within 10 minutes of Mc- Connellsburg.

Owners Tony and Barb Onorato purchased his grandfather Harry Mellott's 130-acre Shady Spring Farm near McConnellsburg in 2004 and set about restoring its 1880s two-story tenant house, a German four-bay structure with two central front doors that is typical of many farmhouses in this area.

The Tenant House's charming kitchen has been returned to the 1930s period and features a working 1935 GE monitor-top refrigerator, a 1911 Moffat's Electra range and an operating 1920s oak cabinet telephone. Local antiques furnish the home throughout, and its traditional patterned wallpaper was printed with 100-year-old rollers in Canada.

Linda and Michael Crampton stand in front of Crampton's Bed & Breakfast near Knobsville. The B&B has a cathedral ceiling and country decor. Linda and Michael Crampton stand in front of Crampton's Bed & Breakfast near Knobsville. The B&B has a cathedral ceiling and country decor. The Onoratos open the Tenant House to guests for nightly, weekly or monthly use. A two-night stay there is being offered in a fundraising raffle to benefit the Historical Society. Raffle tickets can be bought at Morton's Attic, Summer Thyme Floral, Sheep Ridge Farm, the county treasurer's office and the Fulton House over festival weekend.

Near Knobsville, Michael and Linda Crampton have built a boardand batten home that has large timber beams and wraparound porches on 100 acres of land they purchased about 20 years ago. More than a year ago, they opened the upstairs of the home to bed-and-breakfast guests, and in October 2007 the couple built a two-bedroom structure, The Carriage House, for guests who desire more privacy.

Standout features of Crampton Manor B&B include pine walls, a cathedral ceiling, an upstairs loft overlooking the great room and country-style decorating.

Nadine and Charlie Carbaugh's mountaintop home overlooking Mc- Connellsburg was designed by them as a family retreat. They did much of the work themselves with the help of their two children, Michele and Chance.

This working 1935 GE monitor-top refrigerator is one of the features of the restored 1930s-period kitchen at the Tenant House located on Shady Spring Farm near McConnellsburg. This working 1935 GE monitor-top refrigerator is one of the features of the restored 1930s-period kitchen at the Tenant House located on Shady Spring Farm near McConnellsburg. The two-story house features an open floor plan, tongue-andgroove knotty pine walls and exposed beams. Its exterior is covered in vinyl that replicates log siding, a feature that keeps maintenance to a minimum. A wide deck on the first floor provides a great spot for the family retreat's main attraction, a spectacular view of the Great Cove, which should be dressed in autumn's finest colors this weekend.

The county's old jailhouse that has been in the news a lot recently is another stop on the tour. Built next to the courthouse in 1851 for $2,874, visitors to the jail this weekend will see the cellblock and can share stories they might know about the characters who were housed there.

The Fulton House, headquarters fo the Historical Society, is also open to house tour guests and free to the public during the Fall Folk Festival. This landmark building constructed in the late 18th century was a busy inn and stagecoach stop for much of its 200-plus years, but this weekend visitors will find a free museum display of tools and furniture by brothers Luther and Michael Black, a display of loaned teapots, a food stand with homemade beef barely soup and scones and a Friday noon concert featuring the Country Cousins.

Tickets for the house tour are $10 and can be purchased only at the Fulton House. A map with the homes' addresses is printed on the tickets. The house tour runs from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. each day.

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